Psychosocial Effects of Frequent Cannabis Smoking in Adolescent Women of Color: Results from a Prospective Cohort of Inner-City Youth

Nathalie Duroseau, Li Niu, Karen Wilson, Anne Nucci-Sack, Robert D. Burk, Angela Diaz, Nicolas F. Schlecht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Frequent or chronic cannabis use can have negative effects on the adolescent and young adult (AYA) brain and psychosocial development. This study investigated the psychosocial impact of frequent cannabis use in a prospective study of sexually active female AYA patients. Participants completed questionnaires at three separate visits over a period of one year. A total of 545 AYA women were included in our analysis. Most (94%) identified as individuals of color, including 37% as non-Black Hispanic, 16% as Hispanic Black, and 41% as non-Hispanic Black. Multivariable regression analyses showed that using cannabis 20 or more times in the prior month was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of being suspended (OR = 2.71, 95%CI:1.48, 4.57; p <.001), as well as with increased number of depressive symptoms (β = 0.48, 95%CI:0.23, 0.75; p <.001) and delinquent behaviors (β = 0.81, 95%CI:0.56–1.06; p <.001). Cross-lagged models showed that frequent cannabis use was associated with increased depressive symptoms six months later (β = 0.09, p <.05), and higher levels of delinquency six months (β = 0.20, p <.001) and 12 months later (β = 0.12, p <.05). This study demonstrated that frequent cannabis use was prospectively associated with negative psychosocial outcomes for AYA women of color, including depression and delinquency.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health and Addiction
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • Adolescent and young adult
  • Cannabis
  • Delinquency
  • Depression
  • Women

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