Pseudomonas aeruginosa enzyme profiling: Predictor of potential invasiveness and use as an epidemiological tool

J. M. Janda, E. J. Bottone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

The enzymatic potential of 54 clinical and 22 environmental isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from soil and water were evaluated by substrate plate assays. Clinical isolates produced substantial levels of 9 of the 11 enzymes assayed, whereas strains recovered from soil or water were relatively inert enzymatically. Elastase, deoxyribonuclease, and elevated protease activities were associated preferentially with clinical isolates of systemic origin; these activities were found twice as frequently in clinical isolates as in strains derived from sputum or the urogenital tract. Our data suggest that these factors may play an important role in the dissemination of P. aeruginosa from local or superficial sites. A comparison of the enzyme profiles of the environmental and clinical isolates indicated that colonization or infection by environmental strains of P. aeruginosa is a rare event and that environmental and clinical strains comprise separate biovars. Epidemiologically, enzyme profiles permitted the fingerprinting and differentiation of clinical strains from various sources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-60
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1981

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