Primary care detection of chronic kidney disease in adults with Type-2 diabetes: The ADD-CKD study (awareness, detection and drug therapy in type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease)

Lynda A. Szczech, Rebecca C. Stewart, Hsu Lin Su, Richard J. DeLoskey, Brad C. Astor, Chester H. Fox, Peter A. McCullough, Joseph A. Vassalotti

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101 Scopus citations

Abstract

This US, multicenter, observational study assessed the CKD prevalence in adult patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and characterized the proportion of detected and undiagnosed CKD in the primary care setting using the following: a clinician survey; a patient physical exam and medical history; a single blood draw for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and glycosolated hemoglobin (HbA1c); urine dipstick for protein; urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR); two patient quality of life questionnaires; and a 15-month medical record review. The study consisted of 9339 adults with T2DM and 466 investigator sites. Of the 9339 enrolled, 9307 had complete data collection for analysis. The 15-month retrospective review showed urine protein, urine ACR, and eGFR testing were not performed in 51.4%, 52.9% and 15.2% of individuals, respectively. Of the 9307 patients, 5036 (54.1%) had Stage 1-5 CKD based on eGFR and albuminuria; however, only 607 (12.1%) of those patients were identified as having CKD by their clinicians. Clinicians were more successful in diagnosing patients with Stage 3-5 CKD than Stages 1 and 2. There were no differences in clinicians' likelihood of identification of CKD based on practice setting, number of years in practice, or selfreported patients seen per week.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere110535
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 26 Nov 2014

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