Prevalence and Identification of Nasal Airway Obstruction in Patients Presenting to Otolaryngology Clinics: Results From a Large Descriptive Practice Survey

Roheen Raithatha, Anthony Del Signore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Determine the prevalence of nasal airway obstruction (NAO) in patients presenting to general otolaryngology clinics using the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation Scale (NOSE) score as a screening tool. Study Design: The clinic staff at 149 otolaryngology specialty clinics geographically distributed in the United States administered the NOSE Scale assessment to 3533 patients presenting to the clinics over a period of 1 week, regardless of the reason for the visit. All patients completed the NOSE Scale score, and additional data were collected, including the primary reason for the visit. Demographic and patient characteristics were summarized using frequencies and percentages for categorical variables. Results: The overall mean NOSE Scale score for the 3533 patients surveyed was 37.6 (SD 31.5). A total of 37.4% (1320/3533) of surveyed patients, regardless of visit reason, had severe/extreme NAO symptoms. Overall, the most common visit reason category was “Other” (61.2%, 2162/3533), followed by “NAO” (22.6%, 798/3533) and “Sinus” (16.2%, 573/3533). The mean NOSE scores for patients in each of the visit categories were 23.4 (SD 25.9), 64.7 (SD 23.3), and 53.3 (SD 28.1); for “Other,” “NAO,” and “Sinus,” respectively. Among the patients coming in with “NAO” or “Sinus” as a primary complaint, 76.2% (608/798) and 57.2.% (328/573) had severe or extreme NOSE scores. A total of 17.8% (384/2162) of patients coming in for “Other” reasons had NOSE scores indicating moderate to severe/extreme NAO symptoms. Conclusions: The findings of this large, descriptive otolaryngology practice survey found a high prevalence of moderate to severe/extreme NAO among patients presenting to otolaryngology practices. Incorporating assessments, such as the NOSE Scale score and other diagnostic practices into the patient intake workflow and assessments, could help identify symptomatic NAO patients that might otherwise be overlooked.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEar, Nose and Throat Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • NOSE scale
  • diagnosis
  • nasal airway obstruction
  • nasal valve collapse
  • otolaryngology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Prevalence and Identification of Nasal Airway Obstruction in Patients Presenting to Otolaryngology Clinics: Results From a Large Descriptive Practice Survey'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this