Prenatal Fine Particulate Matter, Maternal Micronutrient Antioxidant Intake, and Early Childhood Repeated Wheeze: Effect Modification by Race/Ethnicity and Sex

Yueh Hsiu Mathilda Chiu, Kecia N. Carroll, Brent A. Coull, Srimathi Kannan, Ander Wilson, Rosalind J. Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fine particulate matter (PM2.5 ) potentiates in utero oxidative stress influencing fetal development while antioxidants have potential protective effects. We examined associations among prenatal PM2.5, maternal antioxidant intake, and childhood wheeze in an urban pregnancy cohort (n = 530). Daily PM2.5 exposure over gestation was estimated using a satellite-based spatiotem-porally resolved model. Mothers completed the modified Block98 food frequency questionnaire. Average energy-adjusted percentile intake of β-carotene, vitamins (A, C, E), and trace minerals (zinc, magnesium, selenium) constituted an antioxidant index (AI). Maternal-reported child wheeze was ascertained up to 4.1 ± 2.8 years. Bayesian distributed lag interaction models (BDLIMs) were used to examine time-varying associations between prenatal PM2.5 and repeated wheeze (≥2 episodes) and effect modification by AI, race/ethnicity, and child sex. Covariates included maternal age, education, asthma, and temperature. Women were 39% Black and 33% Hispanic, 36% with ≤high school education; 21% of children had repeated wheeze. Higher AI was associated with decreased wheeze in Blacks (OR = 0.37 (0.19–0.73), per IQR increase). BDLIMs identified a sensitive window for PM2.5 effects on wheeze among boys born to Black mothers with low AI (at 33–40 weeks gestation; OR = 1.74 (1.19–2.54), per µg/m3 increase in PM2.5 ). Relationships among prenatal PM2.5, antioxidant intake, and child wheeze were modified by race/ethnicity and sex.

Original languageEnglish
Article number366
JournalAntioxidants
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022

Keywords

  • Antioxidant intake
  • Childhood wheeze
  • Developmental origins of health and disease
  • Prenatal air pollution exposure
  • Race and ethnicity
  • Sex difference

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