Pre-adaptation to noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation is associated with enhanced sensorimotor performance in novel vestibular environments

Steven T. Moore, Valentina Dilda, Tiffany R. Morris, Don A. Yungher, Hamish G. MacDougall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Performance on a visuomotor task in the presence of novel vestibular stimulation was assessed in nine healthy subjects. Four subjects had previously been adapted to 120 min exposure to noisy Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) over 12 weekly sessions of 10 min; the remaining five subjects had never experienced GVS. Subjects were seated in a flight simulator and asked to null the roll motion of a visual bar presented on a screen using a joystick. Both the visual bar and the simulator cabin were moving in roll with a pseudorandom (sum of sines) waveform that were uncorrelated. The cross correlation coefficient, which ranges from 1 (identical waveforms) to 0 (unrelated waveforms), was calculated for the ideal (perfect nulling of bar motion) and actual joystick input waveform for each subject. The cross correlation coefficient for the GVS-adapted group (0.90 [SD 0.04]) was significantly higher (t[8] = 3.162; p = 0.013) than the control group (0.82 [SD 0.04]), suggesting that prior adaptation to GVS was associated with an enhanced ability to perform the visuomotor task in the presence of novel vestibular noise.

Original languageEnglish
Article number088
JournalFrontiers in Systems Neuroscience
Volume9
Issue numberJune
DOIs
StatePublished - 8 Jun 2015

Keywords

  • Countermeasure
  • Dual adaptation
  • GVS
  • Microgravity
  • Pre-habilitation

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