Posttraumatic stress disorder and occupational disability in South African Security Force members

Robin A. Emsley, Soraya Seedat, Dan J. Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

South African Security Force (SASF) members have been exposed to violence and unrest for many years. However, an alarming recent increase in retirement on psychiatric grounds has coincided with sociopolitical transformation of these services. This study investigated 124 SASF members who were medically retired as a result of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The most striking finding was the long duration of exposure to duty-related incidents (16.9 ± 7.0 years) that preceded the onset of significant symptoms. Ninety percent (N = 112) of members displayed a negative attitude toward their work, and 54% (N = 67) believed that issues related to transformation of the services had played a significant role in their disorder. These findings suggest that posttrauma factors may be as important as pretrauma and peritrauma variables in the development of PTSD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-241
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Volume191
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Posttraumatic stress disorder and occupational disability in South African Security Force members'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this