Positive vasodilator Stress ECG with normal myocardial perfusion imaging and its correlation with coronary angiographic findings in African Americans and Hispanics

Neelima Paladugu, Hussein Shaqra, Steve Blum, Narendra C. Bhalodkar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Ischemic electrocardiographic (ECG) changes during vasodilator stress testing (VST) in the presence of abnormal myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) are uncommon and are associated with presence of multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there is a paucity of data regarding the significance of ischemic ECG changes during VST with normal MPI in general, and especially among African Americans and Hispanics. Hypothesis: Ischemic changes during VST with normal MPI are associated with significant CAD. Methods: A retrospective review was done of 2945 patients undergoing VST. Results: Only 20 patients (0.7%) had positive ECG changes with normal MPI. Their demographics were: 60% Hispanic, 40% African American; 85% female; mean age 63 ± 11 years; history of hypertension 80%, diabetes 50%, and dyslipidemia 75%; smokers 30%; atypical chest pain 60%, and typical chest pain 40%. Of these 20 patients, 12 patients underwent coronary angiography. All 12 had significant CAD; nine (75%) had multivessel disease and 3 (25%) had single-vessel disease. Prevalence of clinical variables and risk factors for CAD were similar among both the groups who did and did not undergo coronary angiography. Conclusions: Among African Americans and Hispanics, ischemic ECG changes during VST with normal MPI are likely to be associated with significant CAD and may warrant coronary angiography to assess presence and extent of CAD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)638-642
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Cardiology
Volume33
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

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