Phonological memory problems are magnified in children from language minority homes when predicting reading disability

Lindsay M. Hardy, Sarah Banker, Meghan Tomb, Yoochai Cha, Irene Zhang, Lauren Thomas, Molly Algermissen, Stephen T. Peverly, Kimberly G. Noble, Amy E. Margolis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Children from language minority (LM) environments speak a language at home that differs from that at school, are often from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds, and are at risk for reading impairment. We evaluated the main effects and interaction of language status and phonological memory and awareness on reading disorder in 352 children from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds. A significant phonological memory by language status interaction indicated that phonological memory problems were magnified in predicting reading impairment in children from LM versus English dominant (ED) homes. Among children without reading disorder, language minority status was unrelated to phonological processing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)680-694
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Child Language
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Ethnicity
  • Language
  • Phonological awareness
  • Phonological memory
  • Phonological processing
  • Reading disorder

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Phonological memory problems are magnified in children from language minority homes when predicting reading disability'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this