Phenotypic definition of the progenitor cells with erythroid differentiation potential present in human adult blood

Valentina Tirelli, Barbara Ghinassi, Anna Rita Migliaccio, Carolyn Whitsett, Francesca Masiello, Massimo Sanchez, Giovanni Migliaccio

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20 Scopus citations

Abstract

In Human Erythroid Massive Amplification (HEMA) cultures, AB mononuclear cells (MNC) generate 1-log more erythroid cells (EBs) than the corresponding CD 34 pos cells, suggesting that MNC may also contain CD 34 neg HPC. To clarify the phenotype of AB HPC which generate EBs in these cultures, flow cytometric profiling for CD34/CD36 expression, followed by isolation and functional characterization (colony-forming-ability in semisolid-media and fold-increase in HEMA) were performed. Four populations with erythroid differentiation potential were identified: CD 34 pos CD 36 neg (0.1); CD 34 pos CD 36 pos (barely detectable-0.1); CD 34 neg CD 36 low (2) and CD 34 neg CD 36 neg (75). In semisolid-media, CD 34 pos CD 36 neg cells generated BFU-E and CFU-GM (in a 1:1 ratio), CD 34 neg CD 36 neg cells mostly BFU-E (87) and CD 34 pos CD 36 pos and CD 34 neg CD 36 low cells were not tested due to low numbers. Under HEMA conditions, CD 34 pos CD 36 neg, CD 34 pos CD 36 pos, CD 34 neg CD 36 low and CD 34 neg CD 36 neg cells generated EBs with fold-increases of 9,000, 100, 60 and 1, respectively, and maturation times (day with >10 C D 36 h i g h C D 235 a h i g h cells) of 107 days. Pyrenocytes were generated only by CD 34 neg / CD 36 neg cells by day 15. These results confirm that the majority of HPC in AB express CD34 but identify additional CD 34 neg populations with erythroid differentiation potential which, based on differences in fold-increase and maturation times, may represent a hierarchy of HPC present in AB.

Original languageEnglish
Article number602483
JournalStem Cells International
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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