Phase II study of cisplatin, epirubicin and continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma (ICC)

Yoriko Takezako, Takuji Okusaka, Hideki Ueno, Masafumi Ikeda, Chigusa Morizane, Mina Najima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/Aims: To clarify the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin, epirubicin, and continuous infusion of 5-FU (CEF therapy) in patients with advanced intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma (ICC). Methodology: Chemo-naive patients with advanced ICC were treated with cisplatin at 80mg/m2 and epirubicin at 50mg/m2 on day 1, and continuous infusion of 5-FU at 500mg/m2/day on days 1 through 5. If there was no evidence of tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity, the treatment was repeated every 4 weeks, up to a maximum of 6 courses. Results: Thirty-nine patients were enrolled in this study. The median number of courses was 2 (range, 1-6). A partial response was obtained in 4 patients (10%) with a median duration of 2.3 months. Twenty-seven patients (69%) showed no change, and 7 patients (18%) had progressive disease. The median survival time was 9.1 months and the 1-year survival rate was 23%. The progression-free survival time was 5.1 months. Grade 3 to 4 adverse effects were leukocytopenia (51%), neutropenia (74%), thrombocytopenia (23%), and nausea/vomiting (10%). Most of the toxicities were reversible, but 2 patients died of neutropenic sepsis. Conclusions: CEF therapy has marginal antitumor activity against advanced ICC, although hematological toxicity is the major and most frequent toxicity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1380-1384
Number of pages5
JournalHepato-Gastroenterology
Volume55
Issue number85
StatePublished - Jul 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • 5-Fluorouracil
  • Chemotherapy
  • Cisplatin
  • Epirubicin
  • Intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma

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