Pharmacological management of acute spinal cord injury: a longitudinal multi-cohort observational study

Catherine R. Jutzeler, Lucie Bourguignon, Bobo Tong, Elias Ronca, Eric Bailey, Noam Y. Harel, Fred Geisler, Adam R. Ferguson, Brian K. Kwon, Jacquelyn J. Cragg, Lukas Grassner, John L.K. Kramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Multiple types and classes of medications are administered in the acute management of traumatic spinal cord injury. Prior clinical studies and evidence from animal models suggest that several of these medications could modify (i.e., enhance or impede) neurological recovery. We aimed to systematically determine the types of medications commonly administered, alone or in combination, in the transition from acute to subacute spinal cord injury. For that purpose, type, class, dosage, timing, and reason for administration were extracted from two large spinal cord injury datasets. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the medications administered within the first 60 days after spinal cord injury. Across 2040 individuals with spinal cord injury, 775 unique medications were administered within the two months after injury. On average, patients enrolled in a clinical trial were administered 9.9 ± 4.9 (range 0–34), 14.3 ± 6.3 (range 1–40), 18.6 ± 8.2 (range 0–58), and 21.5 ± 9.7 (range 0–59) medications within the first 7, 14, 30, and 60 days post-injury, respectively. Those enrolled in an observational study were administered on average 1.7 ± 1.7 (range 0–11), 3.7 ± 3.7 (range 0–24), 8.5 ± 6.3 (range 0–42), and 13.5 ± 8.3 (range 0–52) medications within the first 7, 14, 30, and 60 days post-injury, respectively. Polypharmacy was commonplace (up to 43 medications per day per patient). Approximately 10% of medications were administered acutely as prophylaxis (e.g., against the development of pain or infections). To our knowledge, this was the first time acute pharmacological practices have been comprehensively examined after spinal cord injury. Our study revealed a high degree of polypharmacy in the acute stages of spinal cord injury, raising the potential to impact neurological recovery. All results can be interactively explored on the RXSCI web site (https://jutzelec.shinyapps.io/RxSCI/) and GitHub repository (https://github.com/jutzca/Acute-Pharmacological-Treatment-in-SCI/).

Original languageEnglish
Article number5434
JournalScientific Reports
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Pharmacological management of acute spinal cord injury: a longitudinal multi-cohort observational study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this