PET imaging-guided chemogenetic silencing reveals a critical role of primate rostromedial caudate in reward evaluation

Yuji Nagai, Erika Kikuchi, Walter Lerchner, Ken Ichi Inoue, Bin Ji, Mark A.G. Eldridge, Hiroyuki Kaneko, Yasuyuki Kimura, Arata Oh-Nishi, Yukiko Hori, Yoko Kato, Toshiyuki Hirabayashi, Atsushi Fujimoto, Katsushi Kumata, Ming Rong Zhang, Ichio Aoki, Tetsuya Suhara, Makoto Higuchi, Masahiko Takada, Barry J. RichmondTakafumi Minamimoto

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73 Scopus citations

Abstract

The rostromedial caudate (rmCD) of primates is thought to contribute to reward value processing, but a causal relationship has not been established. Here we use an inhibitory DREADD (Designer Receptor Exclusively Activated by Designer Drug) to repeatedly and non-invasively inactivate rmCD of macaque monkeys. We inject an adeno-associated viral vector expressing the inhibitory DREADD, hM4Di, into the rmCD bilaterally. To visualize DREADD expression in vivo, we develop a non-invasive imaging method using positron emission tomography (PET). PET imaging provides information critical for successful chemogenetic silencing during experiments, in this case the location and level of hM4Di expression, and the relationship between agonist dose and hM4Di receptor occupancy. Here we demonstrate that inactivating bilateral rmCD through activation of hM4Di produces a significant and reproducible loss of sensitivity to reward value in monkeys. Thus, the rmCD is involved in making normal judgments about the value of reward.

Original languageEnglish
Article number13605
JournalNature Communications
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - 6 Dec 2016
Externally publishedYes

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