Peritoneal carcinomatosis in patients with gastric cancer, and the role for surgical resection, cytoreductive surgery, and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy

Ki Won Kim, Oliver Chow, Kunal Parikh, Sima Blank, Ghalib Jibara, Hena Kadri, Daniel M. Labow, Spiros P. Hiotis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background The aims of this study were to create a model of peritoneal carcinomatosis in patients with gastric cancer and to evaluates outcomes in patients with gastric cancer treated using surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). Methods A single-institution cohort of patients with gastric cancer was analyzed according to the development of gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis (GCPC). Variables were evaluated using regression analysis. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate outcomes after surgical resection, cytoreductive surgery, and HIPEC. Results Age ≤60 years and local tumor stage (T3/T4) were significantly associated with GCPC (odds ratio, 3.95 and 3.94, respectively). Thirty-six-month survival was 57% for patients without peritoneal disease and 39% for patients with GCPC. There was no significant trend of improved survival after surgical management or HIPEC. Conclusions Age ≤60 years and T3/T4 tumor stage are risk factors for GCPC. Intermediate-term survival of patients with GCPC treated with surgical resection or cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC was not improved, though future research should address the possible benefits of aggressive approaches to the treatment of GCRC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)78-83
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume207
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Cytoreductive surgery
  • Gastric cancer
  • HIPEC
  • Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy
  • Peritoneal carcinomatosis
  • Surgical resection

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