Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Men, Women, and Minorities With a Previous Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery (from the Pooled PLATINUM Diversity and PROMUS Element Plus Registries)

Frans J. Beerkens, Davide Cao, Wayne Batchelor, Samantha Sartori, David E. Kandzari, Scott Davis, Luis Tamis, John C. Wang, Islam Othman, Birgit Vogel, Alessandro Spirito, Varsha Subramaniam, Osvaldo S. Gigliotti, Amir Haghighat, Yihan Feng, Sarabjeet Singh, Mario Lopez, Gregory Giugliano, Phillip A. Horwitz, George DangasRoxana Mehran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There is limited data on new-generation stent outcomes in patients with previous coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and the associated risk of gender and race/ethnicity is unclear. We investigated 1-year outcomes after platinum chromium everolimus-eluting stent implantation in a diverse population of men, women, and minorities with previous CABG pooled from the PLATINUM Diversity (NCT02240810) and PROMUS Element Plus (NCT01589978) registries. Our primary outcome was major adverse cardiac events (MACE), a composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction (MI), and target vessel revascularization (TVR) at 1-year post percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Secondary end points included all-cause death, MI, TVR, target vessel failure, and stent thrombosis. A total of 4,175 patients were included in the analysis, including 1,858 women (44.5%), 1,057 minorities (25.3%), and 662 (15.9%) with previous CABG. Patients with previous CABG were older, included more men and White patients, and had more co-morbidities compared with patients without previous CABG. At 1 year, patients with previous CABG had a higher risk of MACE (12.6% vs 7.5%, hazard ratio 1.70, 95% confidence interval 1.32 to 2.19, p <0.001) and end points, including death/MI, TVR, and target vessel failure. After multivariate adjustment, no differences were observed in MACE (adjusted hazard ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1.49, p = 0.506) or any secondary end points. No interaction was observed between previous CABG and gender or minority status. In conclusion, in a contemporary PCI population, patients with previous CABG remain at high risk for PCI because of their elevated risk profile. Previous CABG status was however not independently associated with worse outcomes after adjustment, nor was any interaction observed with gender or race/ethnicity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)204-211
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume200
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2023

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