Perceived social support moderates the relation between forward-focused coping and PTSD symptoms in World Trade Center trauma survivors

Mary Kowalchyk, Eva Chernoff, Hannah R. Brinkman, Adam D. Brown, Robert H. Pietrzak, Adriana Feder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social support and perceived ability to cope with trauma have been linked to severity of PTSD symptoms. While previous literature has highlighted the influence of trauma coping style on PTSD severity, data are lacking regarding factors that may moderate this association. Such information may help inform more personalized treatments for PTSD. Toward this end, we analyzed data from 100 treatment-seeking WTC responders and survivors with full or subthreshold World Trade Center (WTC)-related PTSD who completed measures of perceived ability to cope with trauma and perceived social support prior to treatment initiation. Correlation analyses revealed that higher forward-focused perceived ability to cope (r = −0.24) and perceived social support (r = −0.32) were each associated with lower severity of PTSD symptoms. In a multivariable regression analysis, perceived social support emerged as a significant moderator of the relation between forward-focused coping and overall PTSD symptom severity (β = −0.36). Specifically, among individuals with higher forward-focused coping, those with higher social support had lower severity of symptoms than those with lower social support. Results suggest that interventions to bolster social support among trauma survivors with a forward-focusing coping style may help mitigate severity of PTSD symptoms in treatment-seeking trauma survivors with PTSD symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)130-134
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume159
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2023

Keywords

  • 9/11
  • PACT
  • PTSD
  • Social support
  • Trauma

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Perceived social support moderates the relation between forward-focused coping and PTSD symptoms in World Trade Center trauma survivors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this