Peanut, milk, and wheat intake during pregnancy is associated with reduced allergy and asthma in children

Supinda Bunyavanich, Sheryl L. Rifas-Shiman, Thomas A. Platts-Mills, Lisa Workman, Joanne E. Sordillo, Carlos A. Camargo, Matthew W. Gillman, Diane R. Gold, Augusto A. Litonjua

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

109 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Maternal diet during pregnancy may affect childhood allergy and asthma. Objective We sought to examine the associations between maternal intake of common childhood food allergens during early pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma. Methods We studied 1277 mother-child pairs from a US prebirth cohort unselected for any disease. Using food frequency questionnaires administered during the first and second trimesters, we assessed maternal intake of common childhood food allergens during pregnancy. In mid-childhood (mean age, 7.9 years), we assessed food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis by questionnaire and serum-specific IgE levels. We examined the associations between maternal diet during pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma. We also examined the cross-sectional associations between specific food allergies, asthma, and atopic conditions in mid-childhood. Results Food allergy was common (5.6%) in mid-childhood, as was sensitization to at least 1 food allergen (28.0%). Higher maternal peanut intake (each additional z score) during the first trimester was associated with 47% reduced odds of peanut allergic reaction (odds ratio [OR], 0.53; 95% CI, 0.30-0.94). Higher milk intake during the first trimester was associated with reduced asthma (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.69-0.99) and allergic rhinitis (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74-0.97). Higher maternal wheat intake during the second trimester was associated with reduced atopic dermatitis (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.46-0.90). Peanut, wheat, and soy allergy were each cross-sectionally associated with increased childhood asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis (ORs, 3.6 to 8.1). Conclusion Higher maternal intake of peanut, milk, and wheat during early pregnancy was associated with reduced odds of mid-childhood allergy and asthma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1373-1382
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume133
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014

Keywords

  • Maternal diet
  • allergic rhinitis
  • asthma
  • childhood
  • food allergy
  • milk
  • peanut
  • pregnancy
  • sensitization
  • wheat

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