Oxidative stress–related genetic variation and antioxidant vitamin intake in intact and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: a Swedish population-based retrospective cohort study

Sakshi Vats, Kristina Sundquist, Jan Sundquist, Naiqi Zhang, Xiao Wang, Stefan Acosta, Anders Gottsäter, Ashfaque A. Memon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aims The aim of this study is to investigate how genetic variations in genes related to oxidative stress, intake of antioxidant vitamins, and any potential interactions between these factors affect the incidence of intact abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and its rupture (rAAA), accounting for sex differences where possible Methods The present retrospective cohort study (n = 25 252) uses baseline single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and total anti- and results oxidant vitamin intake data from the large population-based, Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Cumulative incidence of intact AAA was 1.6% and of rAAA 0.3% after a median follow-up of 24.3 years. A variant in NOX3 (rs3749930) was associated with higher rAAA risk in males [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR): 2.49; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.36–4.35] and the overall population (aHR: 1.88; 95% CI: 1.05–3.37). Higher intakes of antioxidant vitamins, riboflavin, and folate were associated with 20% and 19% reduced intact AAA incidence, respectively. Interestingly, the inverse associations between riboflavin and vitamin D intake with intact AAA incidence were stronger in the individuals carrying the NOX3 variant as compared with the wild-type recessive genotype, i.e. by 60% and 66%, respectively (P for interaction < 0.05). Higher riboflavin intake was associated with a 33% male-specific intact AAA risk reduction, while higher intake of vitamin B12 intake was associated with 55% female-specific intact AAA risk increase; both these associations were significantly modified by sex (P for interaction < 0.05) Conclusions Our findings highlight the role of oxidative stress genetic variations and antioxidant vitamin intake in AAA. Although a low AAA/rAAA sample size limited some analyses, especially in females, our findings highlight the need for future randomized controlled trials and mechanistic studies, to explore the potential benefits of antioxidant vitamins while accounting for genetic and sex differences. Lay summary Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an old age-related disease with lethal complication in the form of rupture (rAAA). Present study aimed to understand how genetic variations in oxidative stress–related genes and the intake of antioxidant vitamins influence the risk of AAA and rAAA. The study identified specific genetic differences associated with an increased risk of rAAA. Interestingly, higher intakes of riboflavin and folate were linked to a reduced risk of AAA. Interestingly, we observe that both genetics and sex modify the effect of vitamin intake on intact AAA risk, providing new insight into the individual differences in the benefits of vitamins. Although the low sample for rAAA and females limits some conclusions, the findings emphasize the need for future randomized controlled trials to explore the potential benefits of antioxidant vitamins while accounting for genetic and sex differences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-74
Number of pages14
JournalEuropean Journal of Preventive Cardiology
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm
  • Genetics
  • Oxidative stress
  • Sex differences
  • Vitamins

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Oxidative stress–related genetic variation and antioxidant vitamin intake in intact and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: a Swedish population-based retrospective cohort study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this