Outbreak of Invasive Serratia marcescens among Persons Incarcerated in a State Prison, California, USA, March 2020–December 2022

Amanda Kamali, Donna Ferguson, Heather Dowless, Nancy Ortiz, Rituparna Mukhopadhyay, Cassandra Schember, Rawni Lunsford, Justine Hutchinson, Marlena Scherer, John Crandall, Heidi Bauer, Alexander Yu, Akiko Kimura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Serratia marcescens is an environmental gram-negative bacterium that causes invasive disease in rare cases. During 2020–2022, an outbreak of 21 invasive Serratia infections occurred in a prison in California, USA. Most (95%) patients had a history of recent injection drug use (IDU). We performed whole-genome sequencing and found isolates from 8 patients and 2 pieces of IDU equipment were closely related. We also identified social interactions among patients. We recovered S. marcescens from multiple environmental samples throughout the prison, including personal containers storing Cell Block 64 (CB64), a quaternary ammonium disinfectant solution. CB64 preparation and storage conditions were suboptimal for S. marcescens disinfection. The outbreak was likely caused by contaminated CB64 and propagated by shared IDU equipment and social connections. Ensuring appropriate preparation, storage, and availability of disinfectants and enacting interventions to counteract disease spread through IDU can reduce risks for invasive Serratia infections in California prisons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S41-S48
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume30
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - 2024
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Outbreak of Invasive Serratia marcescens among Persons Incarcerated in a State Prison, California, USA, March 2020–December 2022'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this