Open repair of large abdominal wall hernias with and without components separation; an analysis from the ACS-NSQIP database

Nirav K. Desai, I. Michael Leitman, Christopher Mills, Valentina Lavarias, David L. Lucido, Martin S. Karpeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Components separation technique emerged several years ago as a novel procedure to improve durability of repair for ventral abdominal hernias. Almost twenty-five years since its initial description, little comprehensive risk adjusted data exists on the morbidity of this procedure. This study is the largest analysis to date of short-term outcomes for these cases. Methods: The ACS-NSQIP database identified open ventral or incisional hernia repairs with components separation from 2005 to 2012. A data set of cohorts without this technique, matched for preoperative risk factors and operative characteristics, was developed for comparison. A comprehensive risk-adjusted analysis of outcomes and morbidity was performed. Results: A total of 68,439 patients underwent open ventral hernia repair during the study period (2245 with components separation performed (3.3%) and 66,194 without). In comparison with risk-adjusted controls, use of components separation increased operative duration (additional 83 min), length of stay (6.4 days vs. 3.8 days, p < 0.001), return to the OR rate (5.9% vs. 3.6%, p < 0.001), and 30-day morbidity (10.1% vs. 7.6%, p < 0.001) with no increase in mortality (0.0% in each group). Conclusions: Components separation technique for large incisional hernias significantly increases length of stay and postoperative morbidity. Novel strategies to improve short-term outcomes are needed with continued use of this technique.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-19
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Medicine and Surgery
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2016

Keywords

  • Components separation
  • Incisional hernia
  • Ventral hernia

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