Ongoing distress from emotional trauma is related to pain, mood, and physical function in a primary care population

Janette L. Seville, Tim A. Ahles, John H. Wasson, Deborah Johnson, Eileen Callahan, Therese Stukel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The relationship of trauma history to physical and emotional functioning in primary care pain patients was examined. Data were drawn from a mailed screening questionnaire for a larger study designed to evaluate an intervention for improving pain management in primary care. Results indicated that 50.4% of the pain patients reported experiencing at least one previous emotionally traumatic event. Further, 31% of patients with trauma history continued to be bothered by that experience. Finally, patients who continued to be significantly bothered by the trauma reported more pain, emotional distress, poorer social functioning, and more difficulty with engaging in their daily activities than did patients with either no trauma history or who had a trauma history but did not have bothersome thoughts of the trauma. These preliminary findings suggest that the experience of trauma alone was not related to additional impairments in physical and psychosocial functioning. However, the report that one continued to be bothered by thoughts of a trauma was associated with greater impairments in functioning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)256-263
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • COOP charts
  • Functional measures
  • Pain
  • Primary care
  • Trauma history

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