Obicetrapib on top of maximally tolerated lipid-modifying therapies in participants with or at high risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: rationale and designs of BROADWAY and BROOKLYN

Stephen J. Nicholls, Adam J. Nelson, Marc Ditmarsch, John J.P. Kastelein, Christie M. Ballantyne, Kausik K. Ray, Ann Marie Navar, Steven E. Nissen, Anne C. Golberg, Liam R. Brunham, Danielle Curcio, Erin Wuerdeman, Annie Neild, Douglas Kling, rew Hsieh, Mary R. Dicklin, Brian A. Ference, Ulrich Laufs, Maciej Banach, Roxana MehranAlberico L. Catapano, Michael H. Davidson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Obicetrapib, a novel, selective cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, reduces low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), LDL particles, apolipoprotein (Apo) B, and lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) when added to statins with or without ezetimibe. By substantially reducing LDL-C, obicetrapib has the potential to lower atherogenic lipoproteins in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) or heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) whose LDL-C levels remain high despite treatment with available maximally tolerated lipid-modifying therapies, addressing an unmet medical need in a patient population at high risk for cardiovascular events. Methods and results: BROADWAY (NCT05142722) and BROOKLYN (NCT05425745) are ongoing placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized Phase III trials designed to examine the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of obicetrapib as an adjunct to dietary intervention and maximally tolerated lipid-modifying therapies in participants with a history of ASCVD and/or underlying HeFH whose LDL-C is not adequately controlled. The primary efficacy endpoint was the percent change in LDL-C from baseline to day 84. Other endpoints included changes in Apo B, non-HDL-C, HDL-C, Apo A1, Lp(a), and triglycerides in addition to parameters evaluating safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics. BROADWAY also included an adjudicated assessment of major adverse cardiovascular events, measurements of glucose homeostasis, and an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring substudy. A total of 2,532 participants were randomized in BROADWAY and 354 in BROOKLYN to receive obicetrapib 10 mg or placebo (2:1) for 365 days with follow-up through 35 days after the last dose. Results from both trials are anticipated in 2024. Conclusion: These trials will provide safety and efficacy data to support the potential use of obicetrapib among patients with ASCVD or HeFH with elevated LDL-C for whom existing therapies are not sufficiently effective or well-tolerated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-45
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume274
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2024

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