Obesity is independently associated with septic shock, renal complications, and mortality in a multiracial patient cohort hospitalized with COVID-19

Gabrielle Page-Wilson, Rachel Arakawa, Samantha Nemeth, Fletcher Bell, Zachary Girvin, Mary Claire Tuohy, Max Lauring, Blandine Laferrère, Gissette Reyes-Soffer, Karthik Natarajan, Rui Jun Chen, Paul Kurlansky, Judith Korner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Obesity has emerged as a risk factor for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. To inform treatment considerations the relationship between obesity and COVID-19 complications and the influence of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic factors deserves continued attention. Objective To determine if obesity is an independent risk factor for severe COVID-19 complications and mortality and examine the relationship between BMI, race, ethnicity, distressed community index and COVID-19 complications and mortality. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 1,019 SARS-CoV-2 positive adult admitted to an academic medical center (n = 928) and its affiliated community hospital (n-91) in New York City from March 1 to April 18, 2020. Results Median age was 64 years (IQR 52–75), 58.7% were men, 23.0% were Black, and 52.8% were Hispanic. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 75.2%; median BMI was 28.5 kg/m2 (25.1–33.0). Over the study period 23.7% patients died, 27.3% required invasive mechanical ventilation, 22.7% developed septic shock, and 9.1% required renal replacement therapy (RRT). In the multivariable logistic regression model, BMI was associated with complications including intubation (Odds Ratio [OR]1.03, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.01–1.05), septic shock (OR 1.04, CI 1.01–1.06), and RRT (OR1.07, CI 1.04–1.10), and mortality (OR 1.04, CI 1.01–1.06). The odds of death were highest among those with BMI > 40 kg/m2 (OR 2.05, CI 1.04–4.04). Mortality did not differ by race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic distress score, though Black and Asian patients were more likely to require RRT. Conclusions and relevance Severe complications of COVID-19 and death are more likely in patients with obesity, independent of age and comorbidities. While race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status did not impact COVID-19 related mortality, Black and Asian patients were more likely to require RRT. The presence of obesity, and in some instances race, should inform resource allocation and risk stratification in patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0255811
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume16
Issue number8 August
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Obesity is independently associated with septic shock, renal complications, and mortality in a multiracial patient cohort hospitalized with COVID-19'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this