No increase in rates of early-onset neonatal sepsis by antibiotic-resistant group B Streptococcus in the era of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis

Katherine T. Chen, Karen M. Puopolo, Eric C. Eichenwald, Andrew B. Onderdonk, Ellice Lieberman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the rate of early-onset neonatal sepsis by antibiotic-resistant group B Streptococcus. Study design: The time-trend study was conducted at a tertiary care center over the following periods: no protocol for group B Streptococcus prophylaxis (1990 to 1992), risk-based protocol (1993 to 1996), and screening-based protocol (1997 to 2002). Results: A total of 120,952 neonates were born with 118 cases of group B Streptococcus early-onset neonatal sepsis. The rate of group B Streptococcus early-onset neonatal sepsis decreased significantly (from 2.0 to 1.1 to 0.4 per 1000 births, P < .0001). No group B Streptococcus isolate was resistant to ampicillin, penicillin, cefazolin, or vancomycin. From 1997 to 2002, there were 3 clindamycin-resistant group B Streptococcus isolates (14%). The rate of erythromycin-resistant group B Streptococcus early-onset neonatal sepsis did not change (from 0.14 to 0.03 to 0.08 per 1000 births, P = .6). However, cases of erythromycin-resistant group B Streptococcus early-onset neonatal sepsis accounted for an increasing proportion of the remaining cases of group B Streptococcus early-onset neonatal sepsis (from 7.0% to 2.6% to 23.8%, P = .07). Conclusion: We found no increase in rates of antibiotic-resistant group B Streptococcus early-onset neonatal sepsis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1167-1171
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume192
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antibiotic resistance
  • Drug effects
  • Drug therapy
  • Pregnancy complications
  • Streptococcal infections, microbiology, prevention, control
  • Streptococcus agalactiae

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