Neonatal loss of FGFR2 in astroglial cells affects locomotion, sociability, working memory, and glia-neuron interactions in mice

Hanna E. Stevens, Soraya Scuderi, Sarah C. Collica, Simone Tomasi, Tamas L. Horvath, Flora M. Vaccarino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) is almost exclusively expressed in glial cells in postnatal mouse brain, but its impact in glia for brain behavioral functioning is poorly understood. We compared behavioral effects from FGFR2 loss in both neurons and astroglial cells and from FGFR2 loss in astroglial cells by using either the pluripotent progenitor-driven hGFAP-cre or the tamoxifen-inducible astrocyte-driven GFAP-creERT2 in Fgfr2 floxed mice. When FGFR2 was eliminated in embryonic pluripotent precursors or in early postnatal astroglia, mice were hyperactive, and had small changes in working memory, sociability, and anxiety-like behavior. In contrast, FGFR2 loss in astrocytes starting at 8 weeks of age resulted only in reduced anxiety-like behavior. Therefore, early postnatal loss of FGFR2 in astroglia is critical for broad behavioral dysregulation. Neurobiological assessments demonstrated that astrocyte-neuron membrane contact was reduced and glial glutamine synthetase expression increased only by early postnatal FGFR2 loss. We conclude that altered astroglial cell function dependent on FGFR2 in the early postnatal period may result in impaired synaptic development and behavioral regulation, modeling childhood behavioral deficits like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Original languageEnglish
Article number89
JournalTranslational Psychiatry
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023
Externally publishedYes

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