Neighborhood violence and socioeconomic deprivation influence associations between acute air pollution and temperature on childhood asthma in New York city

Rachit Sharma, Jamie L. Humphrey, Lisa Frueh, Ellen J. Kinnee, Perry E. Sheffield, Jane E. Clougherty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ambient air pollution, temperature, and social stressor exposures are linked with asthma risk, with potential synergistic effects. We examined associations for acute pollution and temperature exposures, with modification by neighborhood violent crime and socioeconomic deprivation, on asthma morbidity among children aged 5–17 years year-round in New York City. Using conditional logistic regression in a time-stratified, case-crossover design, we quantified percent excess risk of asthma event per 10-unit increase in daily, residence-specific exposures to PM2.5, NO2, SO2, O3, and minimum daily temperature (Tmin). Data on 145,834 asthma cases presenting to NYC emergency departments from 2005 to 2011 were obtained from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS). Residence- and day-specific spatiotemporal exposures were assigned using the NYC Community Air Survey (NYCCAS) spatial data and daily EPA pollution and NOAA weather data. Point-level NYPD violent crime data for 2009 (study midpoint) was aggregated, and Socioeconomic Deprivation Index (SDI) scores assigned, by census tract. Separate models were fit for each pollutant or temperature exposure for lag days 0–6, controlling for co-exposures and humidity, and mutually-adjusted interactions (modification) by quintile of violent crime and SDI were assessed. We observed stronger main effects for PM2.5 and SO2 in the cold season on lag day 1 [4.90% (95% CI: 3.77–6.04) and 8.57% (5.99–11.21), respectively]; Tmin in the cold season on lag day 0 [2.26% (1.25–3.28)]; and NO2 and O3 in the warm season on lag days 1 [7.86% (6.66–9.07)] and 2 [4.75% (3.53–5.97)], respectively. Violence and SDI modified the main effects in a non-linear manner; contrary to hypotheses, we found stronger associations in lower-violence and -deprivation quintiles. At very high stressor exposures, although asthma exacerbations were highly prevalent, pollution effects were less apparent—suggesting potential saturation effects in socio-environmental synergism.

Original languageEnglish
Article number116235
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume231
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Aug 2023

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Asthma
  • Children
  • Deprivation
  • Temperature
  • Violence

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