Movement related directional tuning from broadband electrocorticography in humans

Ewan S. Nurse, Dean R. Freestone, Thomas J. Oxley, David C. Ackland, Simon J. Vogrin, Michael Murphy, Terence J. O'Brien, Mark J. Cook, David B. Grayden

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Directional tuning is the tendency for cortical neurons to exhibit a peak firing rate when a limb is moved in a preferred direction. This phenomenon has been used to underpin decoding strategies in many brain-machine interface (BMI) systems. Although it is well established that individual motor neurons can be decoded using directional tuning, this is not as well understood at the scale of cortical local field potentials (LFPs). This study investigates the directional tuning properties of broadband electrocorticography (ECoG) recorded during a center-out task from two human participants. Selected bipolar ECoG channels demonstrated directional tuning in signal power from 85 - 250 Hz for both subjects. Directional tuning was observed across sensorimotor cortex, as well as frontal areas of cortex. The presence of directional tuning in broadband ECoG suggests the potential use of tuning curves as the basis of a LFP based BMI system.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2015
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages33-36
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781467363891
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2015 - Montpellier, France
Duration: 22 Apr 201524 Apr 2015

Publication series

NameInternational IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER
Volume2015-July
ISSN (Print)1948-3546
ISSN (Electronic)1948-3554

Conference

Conference7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2015
Country/TerritoryFrance
CityMontpellier
Period22/04/1524/04/15

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