Motivational interviewing to improve health screening uptake: A systematic review

Sarah J. Miller, Kelly Foran-Tuller, Jessica Ledergerber, Lina Jandorf

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective Health screenings, physical tests that diagnose disease, are underutilized. Motivational interviewing (MI) may increase health screening rates. This paper systematically reviewed the published articles that examined the efficacy of MI for improving health screening uptake. Methods Articles published before April 28, 2015 were reviewed from PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL. Study methodology, participant demographics, outcomes and quality were extracted from each article. Results Of the 1573 abstracts, 13 met inclusion criteria. Of the 13 studies, 6 found MI more efficacious than a control, 2 found MI more efficacious than a weak control yet equivalent to an active control, and 3 found MI was not significantly better than a control. Two single arm studies reported improvements in health screening rates following an MI intervention. Conclusions MI shows promise for improving health screening uptake. However, given the mixed results, the variability amongst the studies and the limited number of randomized trials, it is difficult to discern the exact impact of MI on health screening uptake. Practice implications Future research is needed to better understand the impact of MI in this context. Such research would determine whether MI should be integrated into standard clinical practice for improving health screening uptake.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)190-198
Number of pages9
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume100
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2017

Keywords

  • Health screenings
  • Motivational interviewing
  • Prevention

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