Moderately elevated levels of basal follicle-stimulating hormone in young patients predict low ovarian response, but should not be used to disqualify patients from attempting in vitro fertilization

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35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate and compare IVF outcomes of patients within different age categories who had a normal basal FSH level with outcomes of patients with an elevated day 3 FSH level. Design: Retrospective analysis. Setting: Large, private IVF center. Patient(s): We analyzed 2,708 patients. Of these, 2,477 had normal basal FSH levels, and 231 had elevated basal FSH levels (≥13.03 IU/L). Patients were segregated into various age groups. Intervention: Follow-up. Main Outcome Measure(s): Outcomes of IVF overall, including cancellation rates, oocyte yield, and fertilization, implantation, and clinical pregnancy rates (PRs). Result(s): Cancellation rates were significantly higher in patients with elevated day 3 FSH levels compared with patients with normal FSH levels in all age groups. A significantly lower oocyte yield was observed in patients with elevated basal FSH. Fertilization rates were not affected by FSH levels. A significant decrease in the number of embryos available for transfer in patients ≥38 with an elevated day 3 FSH level was found. Implantation and clinical PRs were lower in patients >40 years of age who had an elevated day 3 FSH level when compared to same age patients with a normal day 3 FSH level. Loss rates were not significantly different. Conclusion(s): Young women with an elevated basal FSH level should be counseled differently than older women, and should be given adequate counseling and granted the opportunity to undergo an IVF cycle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)782-787
Number of pages6
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume87
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007

Keywords

  • Elevated basal FSH
  • IVF
  • age
  • cancellation
  • pregnancy

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