Military Blast Injury and Chronic Neurodegeneration: Research Presentations from the 2015 International State-of-The-Science Meeting

Denes Agoston, Peethambaran Arun, Patrick Bellgowan, Steven Broglio, Robert Cantu, David Cook, Uade Olaghere Da Silva, Dara Dickstein, Gregory Elder, Elizabeth Fudge, Sam Gandy, Jessica Gill, John F. Glenn, Raj K. Gupta, Sidney Hinds, Stuart Hoffman, Theresa Lattimore, Alexander Lin, Kun Ping Lu, Joseph MaroonDavid Okonkwo, Daniel Perl, Meghan Robinson, Charles Rosen, Douglas Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a signature injury of recent military conflicts, leading to increased Department of Defense (DoD) interest in its potential long-Term effects, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The DoD Blast Injury Research Program Coordinating Office convened the 2015 International State-of-The-Science Meeting to discuss the existing evidence regarding a causal relationship between TBI and CTE. Over the course of the meeting, experts across government, academia, and the sports community presented cutting edge research on the unique pathological characteristics of blast-related TBI, blast-related neurodegenerative mechanisms, risk factors for CTE, potential biomarkers for CTE, and treatment strategies for chronic neurodegeneration. The current paper summarizes these presentations. Although many advances have been made to address these topics, more research is needed to establish the existence of links between the long-Term effects of single or multiple blast-related TBI and CTE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S6-S17
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume34
Issue numberS1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2017

Keywords

  • blast injury
  • chronic traumatic encephalopathy
  • neurodegeneration
  • repetitive head trauma
  • traumatic brain injury

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