Middle-aged children of Alzheimer parents, a pilot study: Stable neurocognitive performance at 20-year follow-up

Lissy F. Jarvik, Asenath La Rue, Izabella Gokhman, Tracy Harrison, Lori Holt, Bill Steh, Judith Harker, Scott Larson, Pauline Yaralian, Steven Matsuyama, Natalie Rasgon, Daniel Geschwind, Nelson Freimer, Elvira Jimenez, Jeffrey Schaeffer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this pilot study on a convenience sample of 25 offspring of Alzheimer patients (mean age 61.5 ± 8.8 years; range, 50-82) was the early detection of neurocognitive decline. This preliminary report appears to be the first one dealing with 20-year follow-up of neurocognitive data of Alzheimer's disease (AD) children. Digit symbol (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale) was the only of 11 neurocognitive measures with a significant decline. And that decline between first and last testing (mean = 19.98 ± 0.30 years) was on raw scores, not scaled scores. Neither parents' age at onset of AD nor autopsy confirmation or offspring APOE-e4 status influenced neurocognitive results. More robust data than currently available are needed to confirm the findings of this first pilot study and to determine both the trajectory of neurocognitive decline in AD and the risks of developing AD faced by children whose parent had the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-191
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Longitudinal
  • Neurocognitive
  • Offspring

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