Metabolomics of neonatal blood spots reveal distinct phenotypes of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and potential effects of early-life nutrition

Lauren M. Petrick, Courtney Schiffman, William M.B. Edmands, Yukiko Yano, Kelsi Perttula, Todd Whitehead, Catherine Metayer, Craig E. Wheelock, Manish Arora, Hasmik Grigoryan, Henrik Carlsson, Sandrine Dudoit, Stephen M. Rappaport

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Early-life exposures are believed to influence the incidence of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Archived neonatal blood spots (NBS), collected within the first days of life, offer a means to investigate small molecules that reflect early-life exposures. Using untargeted metabolomics, we compared abundances of small-molecule features in extracts of NBS punches from 332 children that later developed ALL and 324 healthy controls. Subjects were stratified by early (1–5 y) and late (6–14 y) diagnosis. Mutually-exclusive sets of metabolic features - representing putative lipids and fatty acids - were associated with ALL, including 9 and 19 metabolites in the early- and late-diagnosis groups, respectively. In the late-diagnosis group, a prominent cluster of features with apparent 18:2 fatty-acid chains suggested that newborn exposure to the essential nutrient, linoleic acid, increased ALL risk. Interestingly, abundances of these putative 18:2 lipids were greater in infants who were fed formula rather than breast milk (colostrum) and increased with the mother's pre-pregnancy body mass index. These results suggest possible etiologic roles of newborn nutrition in late-diagnosis ALL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-78
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Letters
Volume452
DOIs
StatePublished - 28 Jun 2019

Keywords

  • Breastfeeding
  • Lipids
  • Maternal BMI
  • Pre-B ALL
  • t(12;21) translocation

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