Men and women have similar Q angles. A clinical and trigonometric evaluation

R. P. Grelsamer, A. Dubey, C. H. Weinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Q angle is an important determinant of patellar tracking, though its clinical relevance is debatable. One controversy centres around any possible differences in its value between men and women. The accepted, though unproven explanation, for the greater Q angle in women is that a woman has a wider pelvis. However, because of the long distance between the pelvis and patella, relative to the distance from the patella to the tibial tuberosity, large changes in the position of the anterior superior iliac spine are necessary to effect significant changes in the Q angle. In our study of 69 subjects, we did not find such large differences in the position of the anterior superior iliac spine, and found a mean difference of only 2.3° between the Q angles of men and women. Furthermore, we found that men and women of equal height demonstrated similar Q angles, with taller people having slightly smaller Q angles. The slight difference in Q angles between men and women can be explained by the fact that men tend to be taller.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1498-1501
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series B
Volume87
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005
Externally publishedYes

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