Management of failed rotator cuff repair in young patients

Bassem T. Elhassan, Ryan M. Cox, Dave R. Shukla, Julia Lee, Anand M. Murthi, Robert Z. Tashjian, Joseph A. Abboud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Management of failed rotator cuff repair may be difficult, especially in young patients. Various nonmodifiable and modifiable patient factors, including age, tendon quality, rotator cuff tear characteristics, acute or chronic rotator cuff tear, bone quality, tobacco use, and medications, affect rotator cuff repair healing. Surgical variables, such as the technique, timing, tension on the repair, the biomechanical construct, and fixation, as well as the postoperative rehabilitation strategy also affect rotator cuff repair healing. Variable outcomes have been reported in patients who undergo revision rotator cuff repair; however, a systematic surgical approach may increase the likelihood of a successful outcome. Numerous cellular and mechanical biologic augments, including platelet-rich plasma, platelet-rich fibrin matrix, mesenchymal stem cells, and acellular dermal matrix grafts, have been used in rotator cuff repair; however, conflicting or inconclusive outcomes have been reported in patients who undergo revision rotator cuff repair with the use of these augments. A variety of tendon transfer options, including latissimus dorsi, teres major, lower trapezius, pectoralis minor, pectoralis major, combined pectoralis major and latissimus dorsi, and combined latissimus dorsi and teres major, are available for the management of massive irreparable rotator cuff tears. Ultimately, the optimization of surgical techniques and the use of appropriate biologic/tendon transfer techniques, if indicated, is the best method for the management of failed rotator cuff repair.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e261-e271
JournalThe Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Volume25
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

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