Making the Jump: A Qualitative Analysis on the Transition From Bedside Assistant to Console Surgeon in Robotic Surgery Training

Beiqun Zhao, Hannah M. Hollandsworth, Arielle M. Lee, Jenny Lam, Nicole E. Lopez, Benjamin Abbadessa, Samuel Eisenstein, Bard C. Cosman, Sonia L. Ramamoorthy, Lisa A. Parry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine barriers associated with the transition from bedside assistant to console surgeon for general surgery residents in the era of robotic surgery in general surgery training. Design: Qualitative thematic analysis using one-on-one interviews of general surgery residents and attendings conducted between June 2018 and February 2019. Setting: An urban, academic, multihospital general surgery residency program with a robust robotic surgery program. Participants: Convenient and purposeful sampling was performed to ensure a variety of resident graduate-years and attending subspecialties were represented. Sample size was determined by data saturation, which occurred after 20 resident and 7 attending interviews. Results: Residents identified the low volume of general surgery robotic cases, the infrequency of exposure to robotic surgery, and attending comfort with robotic surgery (and with teaching on the robot) as potential barriers in the transition from bedside assistant to console surgeon. Residents had to find a replacement bedside assistant in order to be the console surgeon, which was challenging. In addition, residents felt that the current culture surrounding robotic surgery is very hierarchal, limiting their exposure. Attendings’ trust in the residents’ console skills was a major determining factor in allowing residents on the console. Conclusions: Most robotic surgery education curricula are sequential, requiring the resident to progress from bedside assistant to console surgeon. Unfortunately, there are many potential barriers for residents in the transition from bedside assistant to console surgeon. Some barriers apply to general surgery training overall, but are amplified in robotic surgery, while others are unique to robotic surgery education. Recognition of, and rectifying, these barriers may increase resident participation as the console surgeon.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)461-471
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
Volume77
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Interpersonal and Communication Skills
  • Medical Knowledge
  • Patient Care
  • bedside assistant
  • education
  • general surgery
  • qualitative analysis
  • residency
  • robotic surgery

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Making the Jump: A Qualitative Analysis on the Transition From Bedside Assistant to Console Surgeon in Robotic Surgery Training'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this