Long-term outcomes of patients with oral cavity cancer receiving postoperative radiotherapy after salvage neck dissection for cervical lymph node recurrence

Takeshi Fujisawa, Atsushi Motegi, Hidenari Hirata, Sadamoto Zenda, Hidehiro Hojo, Masaki Nakamura, Hidekazu Oyoshi, Kento Tomizawa, Yuzheng Zhou, Keiko Fukushi, Shun Ichiro Kageyama, Tomohiro Enokida, Susumu Okano, Makoto Tahara, Takeshi Shinozaki, Ryuichi Hayashi, Kazuto Matsuura, Tetsuo Akimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Backgrounds: We aimed to clarify the outcomes of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) after salvage neck dissection for cervical lymph node (LN) recurrence in oral cavity cancer. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), recurrence patterns, and adverse events of 51 patients with high-risk features receiving PORT after salvage neck dissection between 2009 and 2019. Results: After a median follow-up of 7.4 years from PORT initiation, the 7-year OS and RFS rates were 66.3% (95% CI: 54.0–81.3) and 54.6% (95% CI: 42.1–70.9), respectively. Age <70 years and isolated LN recurrence were significantly associated with longer OS and RFS. Among the 22 patients who experienced recurrence, 14 experienced recurrence within the radiation field. PORT-related grade 3 acute mucositis (35%) and late adverse events (osteoradionecrosis [4%] and laryngeal stenosis [2%]) were observed. Conclusions: PORT after salvage neck dissection for cervical LN recurrence achieved good survival with acceptable toxicity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)541-551
Number of pages11
JournalHead and Neck
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • cervical lymph node recurrence
  • long-term outcomes
  • oral cavity cancer
  • postoperative radiotherapy
  • salvage neck dissection

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