Liver, simultaneous liver-kidney, and kidney transplantation from hepatitis C-positive donors in hepatitis C-negative recipients: A single-center study

James F. Crismale, Mian Khalid, Arjun Bhansali, Graciela De Boccardo, Rafael Khaim, Sander S. Florman, Ron Shapiro, Thomas D. Schiano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Transplantation of organs from hepatitis C virus (HCV)-antibody (Ab) and -nucleic acid test (NAT) positive donors into HCV-negative recipients has been proposed to expand the donor pool and shorten waiting times. Data on early single-center outcomes are lacking. Nineteen liver (LT, including seven simultaneous liver-kidney [SLKT]) and 17 kidney transplant (KT) recipients received organs from HCV (+) donors; of these, 13 were HCV NAT (+) in each group. All patients who received organs from HCV NAT (+) donors developed HCV viremia post-transplant except for 2 KT recipients. Patients were treated with a variety of direct-acting antiviral regimens, with high rates of sustained virologic response among those with at least 12 weeks of follow-up past the end of treatment: 12/13 (92%) and 8/8 (100%) among LT/SLKT, and KT recipients. Median time to treatment start was 42 days (interquartile range [IQR] 35-118 days) and 40 days (IQR 26-73) post-LT/SLKT and KT, respectively. One death occurred in a SLKT recipient unrelated to HCV or its treatment. There was no significant increase in rejection, proteinuria, or changes in immunosuppression in any group. Organs from HCV-viremic donors can be utilized for HCV-uninfected recipients with good short-term outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13761
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • hepatitis C virus
  • hepatitis C-positive donors
  • kidney transplantation
  • liver transplantation

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