Lin28a cardiomyocyte-specific modified mRNA translation system induces cardiomyocyte cell division and cardiac repair

Ajit Magadum, Jiacheng Sun, Neha Singh, Ann Anu Kurian, Elena Chepurko, Anthony Fargnoli, Roger Hajjar, Jianyi Zhang, Lior Zangi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The mammalian heart has a limited regenerative capacity. Previous work suggested the heart can regenerate during development and immediately after birth by inducing cardiomyocyte (CM) proliferation; however, this capacity is lost seven days after birth. modRNA gene delivery, the same technology used successfully in the two mRNA vaccines against SARS-CoV-2, can prompt cardiac regeneration, cardiovascular regeneration and cardiac protection. We recently established a novel CM-specific modRNA translational system (SMRTs) that allows modRNA translation only in CMs. We demonstrated that this system delivers potent intracellular genes (e.g., cell cyclepromoting Pkm2), which are beneficial when expressed in one cell type (i.e., CMs) but not others (non-CMs). Here, we identify Lin28a as an important regulator of the CM cell cycle. We show that Lin28a is expressed in CMs during development and immediately after birth, but not during adulthood. We describe that specific delivery of Lin28a into CM, using CM SMRTs, enables CM cell division and proliferation. Further, we determine that this proliferation leads to cardiac repair and better outcome post MI. Moreover, we identify the molecular pathway of Lin28a in CMs. We also demonstrate that Lin28a suppress Let-7 which is vital for CM proliferation, partially due to its suppressive role on cMYC, HMGA2 and K-RAS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-64
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology
Volume188
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2024

Keywords

  • Cardiac regeneration
  • Genetic medicine
  • Modified mRNA

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