Level of ‘outness’ and pornography use among men who have sex with men: results from an online survey

Richard J. Silvera, Christian Grov, Dylan J. Stein, Robert Hagerty, Michael Marmor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Higher levels of ‘outness’ – a fundamental experience of people who experience same-sex attraction or engage in same-sex relationships – have been associated with increased community engagement, improved self-worth and relationship satisfaction. Pornography viewing is common among men who have sex with men (MSM), and may be associated with outness. Current literature lacks analyses of outness and pornography viewing among MSM. In data taken from a 2009 online survey 1995 MSM participants reported accessing pornography via the Internet (58.8%), video/digital versatile disc (32.3%) and magazines (10.4%). Viewing of pornography portraying only safer sex encounters (oral sex, mutual masturbation and/or anal sex with condoms) was reported by 49.4%; 4.5% reported exclusively viewing high-risk sex (anal sex without condoms with/without oral sex or mutual masturbation); and 46.1% reported viewing both safer sex and high-risk pornography. In multivariable modelling – compared to the other two groups – men who watched only safer sex pornography were more likely to report being single, HIV negative, a lower degree of outness and to indicate their sex life resembled pornography. Self-identifying as gay was not associated with type of pornography watched. These findings highlight the need to incorporate level of outness when analysing pornography-viewing behaviours among MSM, as outness may be associated with different viewing habits.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-58
Number of pages15
JournalPsychology and Sexuality
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • gay and bisexual men
  • outness
  • pornography
  • safer sex
  • unprotected sex

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