Lack of improvement in anorectal manometry parameters after implementation of a pelvic floor/anal sphincter biofeedback in persons with motor-incomplete spinal cord injury

Mark M. Aloysius, Mark A. Korsten, Miroslav Radulovic, Kamaldeep Singh, Brian L. Lyons, Tradd Cummings, Joshua Hobson, Sandeep Kahal, Ann M. Spungen, William A. Bauman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Effect of biofeedback on improving anorectal manometric parameters in incomplete spinal cord injury is unknown. A short-term biofeedback program investigated any effect on anorectal manometric parameters without correlation to bowel symptoms. Methods: This prospective uncontrolled interventional study comprised three study subject groups, Group 1: sensory/motor-complete American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) A SCI (n = 13); Group 2 (biofeedback group): sensory incomplete AIS B SCI (n = 17) (n = 3), and motor-incomplete AIS C SCI (n = 8), and AIS D SCI (n = 6); and Group 3: able-bodied (AB) controls (n = 12). High-resolution anorectal manometry (HR-ARM) was applied to establish baseline characteristics in all subjects for anorectal pressure, volume, length of pressure zones, and duration of sphincter squeeze pressure. SCI participants with motor-incomplete SCI were enrolled in pelvic floor/anal sphincter bowel biofeedback training (2 × 6-week training periods comprised of two training sessions per week for 30–45 min per session). HR-ARM was also performed after each of the 6-week periods of biofeedback training. Results: Compared to motor-complete or motor-incomplete SCI participants, AB subjects had higher mean intra-rectal pressure, maximal sphincteric pressure, residual anal pressure, recto-anal pressure gradient, and duration of squeeze (p < 0.05 for each of the endpoints). No significant difference was evident at baseline between the motor-complete and motor-incomplete SCI groups. In motor-incomplete SCI subjects, the pelvic floor/anal sphincter biofeedback protocol failed to improve HR-ARM parameters. Conclusion: Biofeedback training program did not improve anal manometric parameters in subjects with motor-incomplete or sensory-incomplete SCI. Biofeedback did not change physiology, and its effects on symptoms are unknown. Inferences: Utility of biofeedback is limited in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury in terms of improving HR-ARM parameters.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere14667
JournalNeurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume35
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2023

Keywords

  • biofeedback
  • high resolution anorectal manometry
  • spinal cord injury
  • supraconal lesions

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