Intravitreal argon and carbon dioxide laser, and xenon arc photocoagulation in vitreoretinal surgery

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Abstract

Argon laser, carbon dioxide laser, and xenon arc endophotocoagulators have been used intravitreally to produce chorioretinal lesions during the course of the vitrectomy procedure. The advantages and disadvantages of each method of endophotocoagulation are presented. Both the argon laser and the xenon arc have a fiber optic delivery system. The carbon dioxide delivery system has a series of quartz waveguides transmitted through a miniature articulating arm. The advantages of using a carbon dioxide laser are its dual quality to act as both a photocoagulator and phototransector, its lack of pigment dependence, and its ability to deposit its energy in a well-defined area without adverse effects on neighboring ocular tissue.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-225
Number of pages5
JournalGraefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology
Volume224
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1986
Externally publishedYes

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