Interleukin-16 aggravates ovalbumin-induced allergic inflammation by enhancing Th2 and Th17 cytokine production in a mouse model

Chunxia Li, Jun Dai, Guanjun Dong, Qun Ma, Zhihua Li, Hui Zhang, Fenglian Yan, Junfeng Zhang, Bo Wang, Hui Shi, Yuzhen Zhu, Xiaoying Yao, Chuanping Si, Huabao Xiong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease that involves a variety of cytokines and cells. Interleukin-16 (IL-16) is highly expressed during allergic airway inflammation and is involved in its development. However, its specific mechanism of action remains unclear. In the present study, we used an animal model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma with mice harboring an IL-16 gene deletion to investigate the role of this cytokine in asthma, in addition to its underlying mechanism. Increased IL-16 expression was observed during OVA-induced asthma in C57BL/6J mice. However, when OVA was used to induce asthma in IL-16−/− mice, a diminished inflammatory reaction, decreased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) eosinophil numbers, and the suppression of OVA-specific IgE levels in the serum and BALF were observed. The results also demonstrated decreased levels of T helper type 2 (Th2) and Th17 cytokines upon OVA-induced asthma in IL-16−/− mice. Hence, we confirmed that IL-16 enhances the lung allergic inflammatory response and suggest a mechanism possibly associated with the up-regulation of IgE and the promotion of Th2 and Th17 cytokine production. This work explored the mechanism underlying the regulation of IL-16 in asthma and provides a new target for the clinical treatment of asthma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-267
Number of pages11
JournalImmunology
Volume157
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2019

Keywords

  • IgE
  • T helper type 17 cytokines
  • T helper type 2 cytokines
  • interleukin-16
  • ovalbumin-induced asthma

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