Intensive amplitude-specific therapeutic approaches for Parkinson's disease: Toward a neuroplasticity-principled rehabilitation model

Becky G. Farley, Cynthia M. Fox, Lorraine O. Ramig, David H. McFarland

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent scientific advances in animal models of Parkinson disease suggest exercise is a legitimate disease-modifying therapeutic option that contributes to behavioral recovery and neurochemical sparing. These data challenge current rehabilitative assumptions and emphasize the need for neuroplasticity-principled exercise-based approaches to challenge the impaired system. We suggest one novel solution - the intensive practice of amplitude - a global motor control parameter. Training a single focus (amplitude) across (1) disciplines (physical, occupational, speech therapy), (2) tasks (transfers, activities of daily living, recreation), and (3) motor systems (speech, locomotion, reaching) may provide the complexity, difficulty, and repetition necessary for disease-modification in human Parkinson disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-114
Number of pages16
JournalTopics in Geriatric Rehabilitation
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Amplitude
  • Cross-system effects
  • Cueing
  • Exercise
  • Motor training
  • Neuroplasticity
  • Recovery
  • Rehabilitation

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