Integration of human α-satellite DNA into simian chromosomes: Centromere protein binding and disruption of normal chromosome segregation

Thomas Haaf, Peter E. Warburton, Huntington F. Willard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

185 Scopus citations

Abstract

Centromeres of mammalian and other complex eukaryotic chromosomes are dominated by one or more classes of satellite DNA. To test the hypothesis that α-satellite DNA, the major centromeric satellite of primate chromosomes, is involved in centromere structure and/or function, human α-satellite DNA was introduced into African green monkey (AGM) cells. Centromere protein binding was apparent at the sites of integrated human α-satellite DNA. In the presence of an AGM centromere on the same chromosome, human α-satellite was associated with bridges between the separating sets of chromatids at anaphase and an increased number of lagging chromosomes at metaphase, both features consistent with the integrated α-satellite disrupting normal chromosome segregation. These experiments suggest that α-satellite DNA provides the primary sequence information for centromere protein binding and for at least some functional aspect(s) of a mammalian centromere, playing a role either in kinetochore formation or in sister chromatid apposition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)681-696
Number of pages16
JournalCell
Volume70
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 21 Aug 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Integration of human α-satellite DNA into simian chromosomes: Centromere protein binding and disruption of normal chromosome segregation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this