Informed consent in the older adult: OSCEs for assessing fellows ACGME and geriatric gastroenterology competencies

Brijen Shah, Roy Miler, Michael Poles, Sondra Zabar, Colleen Gillespie, Elizabeth Weinshel, Sita Chokhavatia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The American Gastroenterological Association fellowship curriculum identifies geriatric components for gastroenterology (GI) training; however, few tools are available for this purpose. Using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), we aimed to assess ACGME competencies of communication, professionalism, and geriatric-specific patient care among GI fellows. Methods: We developed an informed-consent case involving a geriatric patient who needs surveillance colonoscopy. We used a validated faculty skills checklist to rate fellows across three competency domains. Fifteen fellows from four GI training programs participated. Results: Although the fellows excelled at communication and professionalism, only 51% excelled at geriatric-specific patient-care skills. Fellows were least likely to demonstrate collaboration with the patient, to assess patient understanding, and to explain the limits of the test. Communication and geriatric-specific skills were correlated. Conclusions: OSCEs are a feasible method for assessing geriatric-related ACGME competencies for fellows. The results highlight the need for curriculum development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1575-1579
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume106
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Informed consent in the older adult: OSCEs for assessing fellows ACGME and geriatric gastroenterology competencies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this