Influence of pressure on permeability of normal and diseased muscular arteries to horseradish peroxidase. A new catheter approach

Bruce Goldman, Heiner Blanke, Harvey Wolinsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

67 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of different distending pressures on permeability of dog and human arteries to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were studied. A new catheter was employed to achieve the distention of defined vessel segments to the desired pressure. Normal dog brachial arteries were studied both post mortem and in vivo. Mildly to moderately diseased human coronary arteries were studied post mortem. A predictable linear relationship between pressure and penetration of HRP into the dog arterial media was found, using pressures of 0, 150, 300 and 500 mm Hg. Postmortem vessels were consistently less permeable than those studied in vivo. Full penetration of the media by HRP was achieved by application of 300 mm Hg pressure for 45 sec with the new catheter. When human coronary lesions were examined under these same conditions, plaques were readily demonstrated to be permeable to HRP, even to a depth of many hundreds of micrometer. Thus, penetration of arterial wall thickness by HRP (Mr 40000 dalton) is related to the distending pressure applied. Human coronary plaques also show ready penetrance by HRP. The new catheter described allows the application of these pressures to defined segments of the arterial tree.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-225
Number of pages11
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume65
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1987
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Artery
  • Catheter
  • Permeability
  • Pressure

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Influence of pressure on permeability of normal and diseased muscular arteries to horseradish peroxidase. A new catheter approach'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this