In vivo diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution microendoscopy in differentiating neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps: A prospective study

Neil D. Parikh, Daniel Perl, Michelle H. Lee, Brijen Shah, Yuki Young, Shannon S. Chang, Richa Shukla, Alexandros D. Polydorides, Erin Moshier, James Godbold, Elinor Zhou, Josephine Mitcham, Rebecca Richards-Kortum, Sharmila Anandasabapathy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:High-resolution microendoscopy (HRME) is a low-cost, "optical biopsy" technology that allows for subcellular imaging. The purpose of this study was to determine the in vivo diagnostic accuracy of the HRME for the differentiation of neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps and compare it to that of high-definition white-light endoscopy (WLE) with histopathology as the gold standard.METHODS:Three endoscopists prospectively detected a total of 171 polyps from 94 patients that were then imaged by HRME and classified in real-time as neoplastic (adenomatous, cancer) or non-neoplastic (normal, hyperplastic, inflammatory).RESULTS:HRME had a significantly higher accuracy (94%), specificity (95%), and positive predictive value (PPV, 87%) for the determination of neoplastic colorectal polyps compared with WLE (65%, 39%, and 55%, respectively). When looking at small colorectal polyps (less than 10 mm), HRME continued to significantly outperform WLE in terms of accuracy (95% vs. 64%), specificity (98% vs. 40%) and PPV (92% vs. 55%). These trends continued when evaluating diminutive polyps (less than 5 mm) as HRME's accuracy (95%), specificity (98%), and PPV (93%) were all significantly greater than their WLE counterparts (62%, 41%, and 53%, respectively).CONCLUSIONS:In conclusion, this in vivo study demonstrates that HRME can be a very effective modality in the differentiation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. A combination of standard white-light colonoscopy for polyp detection and HRME for polyp classification has the potential to truly allow the endoscopist to selectively determine which lesions can be left in situ, which lesions can simply be discarded, and which lesions need formal histopathologic analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68-75
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume109
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

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