Impact of Race/Ethnicity on Long Term Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention with Drug-Eluting Stents

Anastasios Roumeliotis, Bimmer Claessen, Samantha Sartori, Davide Cao, Won Joon Koh, Hanbo Qiu, Johny Nicolas, Rishi Chandiramani, Ridhima Goel, Mauro Chiarito, Joseph Sweeny, Nitin Barman, Prakash Krishnan, Annapoorna Kini, Samin K. Sharma, George Dangas, Roxana Mehran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease constitutes the leading cause of mortality worldwide, irrespective of race/ethnicity. Previous studies have shown that minority patients with acute coronary syndrome have distinct clinical, anatomic, and socioeconomic characteristics which may affect clinical outcomes. We included patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-STEMI, or unstable angina in a single center. Patients were stratified into Caucasian, African-American, Hispanic, and Asian. Caucasians were the reference group. The primary end point was major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events, composite of death, spontaneous myocardial infarction, or stroke at 1 year. Of 6,800 patients included, 49.7% were Caucasian, 20.7% Hispanic, 17.0% Asian and 12.6% African-American. Caucasians were the oldest, Hispanics and Asians had the highest prevalence of diabetes mellitus whereas African-Americans had more chronic kidney disease. Hispanics and African-Americans had the highest STEMI rates, whereas Asians were more likely to present with unstable angina. Compared with Caucasians, Asians had a lower rate of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events at 1 year (3.9% vs 7.1%; p <0.01) whereas Hispanics (6.2% vs 7.1%; p = 0.17) and African-Americans (8.0% vs 7.1%; p = 0.38) had comparable outcomes. Differences were driven by mortality. Findings remained unchanged after adjustment. In conclusion, in acute coronary syndrome patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention, Asian race/ethnicity was associated with favorable cardiovascular outcomes compared with Caucasians. No significant differences were observed for Hispanics and African-Americans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume167
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Mar 2022

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