Impact of laparoscopic donor nephrectomy on allograft function in pediatric renal transplant recipients: A single-center report

Noosha Baqi, Jeffrey Stock, Salvatore A. Lombardo, Stuart Geffner, Isabel Roberti

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN) is rapidly becoming the preferred technique for the procurement of living donor kidneys. An association of this technique with delayed graft function and higher risk for rejection has been reported in pediatric recipients. We reviewed our experience of 17 pediatric patients who received a living donor kidney, from 2002 to 2004, procured by LDN, and compared it with a matched group that received living donor kidneys harvested by the open technique. Patient demographics, etiology of renal failure, intra-operative events, length of stay, serum creatinine decline, and graft function were reviewed. Our experience confirmed the findings of earlier reports specifically in small pediatric recipients. The LDN group showed a significantly slower decline in creatinine in the immediate post-operative period and longer intra-operative time. However, there was no difference between the two groups in the length of hospital stay, and creatinine clearances at discharge, six, 12 and 24 months post-operatively. The incidence of acute rejection was similar in both groups. LDN is a safe procurement modality for pediatric patients. The risk for prolonged OR time and delay graft function has to be considered during the evaluation process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)354-357
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Transplantation
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Delayed graft function
  • Laparoscopic nephrectomy
  • Living donor
  • Pediatric kidney transplantation
  • Rejection

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