Impact of High-Density Lipoprotein Levels on Cardiovascular Outcomes of Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Drug-Eluting Stents

Anastasios Roumeliotis, Bimmer Claessen, George Dangas, Rebecca Torguson, Samantha Sartori, Adam Reisman, Davide Cao, Rishi Chandiramani, Johny Nicolas, Ridhima Goel, Mauro Chiarito, Madhav Sharma, Dhrubajyoti Bandyopadhyay, Usman Baber, Joseph Sweeny, Nitin Barman, Samin Sharma, Annapoorna Kini, Roxana Mehran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular events in epidemiologic studies. Evidence regarding its role in patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is scarce. We evaluated consecutive patients who underwent PCI with drug-eluting stents from 2012 to 2017, excluding those with unavailable baseline HDL, age <18 years, presentation with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) or shock, and coexisting neoplastic disease. The final population was stratified according to baseline HDL levels into reduced and nonreduced HDL cohorts, with cut-off value 40 mg/dl in males and 50 mg/dl in females. The primary end point was 1-year major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), defined as the composite of death, MI, or target vessel revascularization (TVR). Among 10,843 patients included, 6,511 (60%) had reduced HDL, and 4,332 (40%) nonreduced HDL. The rate of 1-year MACE was similar between the 2 groups (7.5% vs 6.6%; p = 0.14). Although mortality and MI rates were comparable, reduced HDL was associated with significantly higher TVR 5.2% vs 4.0%; p = 0.02, a finding that attenuated after multivariable adjustment (adjusted hazard ratio 1.18, p = 0.14). Sex subgroup analysis included 7,718 (71.2%) males and 3,125 (28.8%) females. Among men, there was a trend toward higher MACE in those with reduced HDL (7.4% vs 6.0%; p = 0.08) mostly driven by TVR (5.4% vs 3.7%; p = 0.005). No association between HDL and 1-year outcomes was evident in females. Assessment for interaction between sex and reduced HDL did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, reduced baseline HDL was not associated with increased risk of MACE in a contemporary PCI population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume137
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Dec 2020

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